Relative dating with stratigraphy is based on the principle of

Relative dating is a dating method that used to determine determine the relative ages of geologic strata, artifacts, historical events, etc.

This technique does not give specific ages to items.

Your goal is to study the smooth, parallel layers of rock to learn how the land built up over geologic time.

Now imagine that you come upon a formation like this: What do you think of it? How can you make any conclusions about rock layers that make such a crazy arrangement?

The most common relative dating method is stratigraphy.

Other methods include fluorine dating, nitrogen dating, association with bones of extinct fauna, association with certain pollen profiles, association with geological features such as beaches, terraces and river meanders, and the establishment of cultural seriations.

How do we know this and how do we know the ages of other events in Earth history?

We'll even visit the Grand Canyon to solve the mystery of the Great Unconformity!

Imagine that you're a geologist, studying the amazing rock formations of the Grand Canyon.

Between the years of 17, James Hutton and William Smith advanced the concept of relative dating.

Hutton, a Scottish geologist, first proposed formally the fundamental principle used to classify rocks according to their relative ages.

Relative dating with stratigraphy is based on the principle of